This Week in Techdirt History: August 14-20

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from the years go by department

Five years ago

This week in 2017, the FCC unveiled its new broadband ‘advisory group’ which was filled with telecommunications consultants, allies and cronies, and set to work to weaken the definition of quality broadband. , while a former commissioner tried to claim that net neutrality was helping the rise of white supremacy. A Florida city ignored legal precedent in an effort to identify and silence a critic, a court dismissed a silly argument that Yahoo had lost Section 230 immunity, and we had a discussion about the podcast about SESTA and why 230 matters. Additionally, Mike won an EFF Pioneer award.

Ten years ago

This week in 2012, we listed seven reasons why Google made a mistake by agreeing to filter searches based on DMCA notices, while a new TED talk by Kirby Ferguson offered a compelling explanation of how the laws on copyright and patents conflict with creativity. SurfTheChannel owner Anton Vickerman was sentenced to four years in prison for ‘conspiracy’, the label’s funds at the RIAA were drying up, the next TPP negotiation session was organized with only three hours allotted to speak to defenders of public interest, and Universal Music used a bogus DMCA claim to take down a negative review of Drake’s album.

Fifteen years ago

This week in 2007, Google decided to remove its DRM video service and make videos that people thought they had purchased disappear, Time Warner was working on enabling time shifting but without the ability to fast forward, and Limewire became the latest P2P company trying to go legit. A host of companies, including Diebold and Disney, were caught editing Wikipedia entries in their favor, while a Skype outage highlighted Skype being more centralized than expected. The RIAA was ignoring a court ruling on a bogus lawsuit and not paying the legal costs it was ordered to pay, while we saw two very different responses to one of the agency’s lawsuits: Tonya Andersen was trying to turn her own lawsuit against RIAA practices into a class action lawsuit, while Michelle Santangelo sued Kazaa, AOL, and anyone else she could think of because the RIAA sued her.

Filed Under: History, Looking Back

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